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Chemicals of Concern Quiz:

 

 

Our Global Challenge:

We realized early on that household pollutants negatively impact our health and our environment. Most of the chemicals in products in our homes have never been assessed for their impact on human health. Indoor air pollution is one of the top five highest ranking environmental health problems in America with chemical levels up to 70 times higher than outside. Research and information on the health effects of manufactured chemicals has not kept pace with their development and use.

  • In the last 50 years, the global production and use of manufactured chemicals has increased substantially. More than 80,000 new chemicals have been created.
  • Indoor air pollution is one of the top five highest-ranking environmental health problems in America.
  • Evidence shows homes have chemical levels up to 70 times higher than outside.
  • Most of the chemicals that people are exposed to every day have never been assessed for their impact on human health.
  • Parabens utilized in personal care for decades have been shown to have potential harmful effects.

What we do know is the harm chemicals have on humans is extensive. Most concerning are the growing links to chemicals that surround us in everyday life. They are linked to serious diseases such as birth defects, cancer and psychological abnormalities. Many today believe the extensive use of chemicals indoors contributes to many of our ‘modern’ diseases such as allergies and asthma.

Our Mission at Norwex is to improve quality of life by radically reducing chemicals in our homes. In addition, the Norwex products make cleaning faster and more cost effective than traditional cleaning products.

Beautiful Globe (Earth) resting on a vibrant green leafThe Norwex Solution

  • With Norwex Microfiber System, you will not breathe, touch or ingest chemicals – you simply create a cleaner, healthier indoor environment.
  • Naturally Timeless personal care products offer cutting-edge technology coupled with organic and natural ingredients – without harmful parabens or preservatives.
  • SAVE Time – the Norwex Cleaning System decreases cleaning time by 75% or more.
  • SAVE Money – An average household spends $600-$800 a year on chemical cleaning products and supplies. By using Norwex products you can realize up to a 90% savings!
  • Norwex helps make cleaning fast,fun and easy and teaches your family how to improve their health and environment!

At Norwex, our Purpose is simple but powerful: The idea that working together, with trust, integrity and honesty as our Core Values and radically reducing chemicals in our homes as our Mission, we can improve the world around us. The Norwex Purpose touches many facets of life with the end result being the ability to collectively make a powerful and positive difference in the world we live in and the lives we touch.

Go get yourself some great toxin-free cleaning supplies for your home and body – and for those you LOVE. Click HERE!

Mom gets back on track …

 

4796_700x350_April_2016_MirandaJ

Miranda Jayroe lost 51.1 lbs. in 11 weeks with FOCUS T25 and Shakeology. She entered her results into the Beachbody Challenge, and won the $500 Daily Prize for April 14th!

Tell us about your life before you started the program. How did you feel about yourself and your body?
I’m a mom who gained too much weight during my two back-to-back pregnancies. I was tired of being unhealthy and out of shape!

What inspired you to change your life and begin your transformation journey?
I really wanted to get rid of this baby weight and tone up!

What is the greatest challenge you faced before beginning the program? How did the program and Beachbody help you overcome that challenge?
Getting motivated was definitely a hard thing to overcome! But after a few days of the workouts, it wasn’t as hard to get myself going! I loved that the workouts were only 25 minutes.

What in particular did you like about the program you chose?
I love Shaun! He is so motivational throughout the whole thing. He helps push you to finish. And I love that it’s only 25 minutes!

4796_BBC_DailyWinners_April_640x640_MirandaJ

Describe the results you achieved with your Beachbody program. Which achievements are you proud of?
I am proud that I was able to stick to it and finish the program! I feel so much stronger.

How has your life changed since completing your Beachbody program?
I feel more energized, and am ready to continue with my new fitness journey!

How did participating in a Challenge Group help you reach your goals? How did your group support you and keep you accountable?
They all helped hold me accountable!

How did your Team Beachbody Coach support you on your journey?
Nicole was very supportive the whole time! She helped me with my biggest struggle: my nutrition!

You can change your life, too. Take the Beachbody Challenge for the tools you need to Decide, Commit, and Succeed! Complete any Beachbody program, and enter your results for a free gift and a chance to win cash and prizes.

5 Reasons You Don’t Work Out

5 Reasons You Don't Work Out | BeachbodyBlog.com

Reasons You Don’t Work Out |

You’re tired. You’re busy. You’re watching the kids. You’re on the road, and unfamiliar with the area. We hear you, and we know what you’re thinking: Skipping just one workout can’t hurt, can it? Unfortunately, it can: Missing even a single workout can initiate a downward spiral, increasing the likelihood that you’ll skip another one by 61 percent, according to British researchers.

So what’s a successful, time-crunched, modern day road-warrior like yourself to do? Exercise anyway. Even if you’ve skipped a whole month (or two) of workouts, you can regain most of what you lost in as little as 6 weeks, according to a study by Swedish researchers. Follow the tips below to bust five of the most common excuses and get your workouts back on track.

 

Excuse: You’re too tired at the end of the day.
The Fix: First, fuel up smarter in the afternoon. Swap out your high-carb, energy-spiking granola bar or yogurt snack for an energy-sustaining protein shake, or a handful of nuts or sesame seeds. Next, enlist some social support. “Find a fun, motivating group fitness class, or a workout buddy with the same qualities,” says Rachel Vaziralli, M.S., a master trainer at Equinox Fitness in New York. Science agrees: Exercising with a new workout partner can make it easer to stick a workout schedule, according to a recent study by Swiss researchers.

 

Excuse: You don’t have an hour to work out. Ever.
The Fix: Who says your workout has to take an hour—or even 30 minutes? Less than 10 minutes of high intensity interval training (HIIT) performed within a workout lasting less than 30 minutes can improve aerobic capacity and exercise tolerance (i.e., stamina) in just a few weeks, according to a recent study at McMaster University. Now imagine how fit you can get if every minute in your workout revolved around HIIT? Stop wondering and start benefiting by signing up for Beachbody On Demand.

 

Excuse: The workout seems too hard.
The Fix: Now’s the time to listen to your body. You should feel energized after your workout, not defeated. “When you push and you’re not ready for it, you end up not performing the exercises properly, making them less effective and increasing your risk of injury,” says Vaziralli. Dial back the difficulty on your current workout by lowering the weight, reducing reps, or increasing the rest between sets. Many exercises can also be modified (e.g., elevating your hands on a box during pushup, or doing a quarter squat instead of a full squat), allowing you to work the same muscles without compromising your form.

 

Excuse: You don’t know the area.
The Fix: If you’re on the road in an unfamiliar city and want to break free of the gym, see if your hotel has an in-house fitness concierge. Westin hotels, for example, will not only hook you up with workout clothes and a fresh pair of running shoes for just $5, but will also take you on a group run if you’re interested. Rather head out on your own? Search MapMyRun,RunKeeper, and USA Track and Field for local, user-rated running routes.

 

Excuse: You can’t exercise and watch your kids at the same time.
The Fix: If your kids are young enough to require constant supervision (and you have a supportive spouse), you’ll likely need to transition to AM workouts while the little ones are asleep. “It’s going to be a grind the first couple days, but once you adjust, your body will be primed for morning workouts,” says Dr. John Rusin, D.P.T., C.S.C.S., owner of John Rusin Fitness Systems and the father of two young children. Older kids might allow you to carve out some exercise time in another room, but you’ll still need to be home. That’s where streaming services (like Beachbody On Demand) can be a lifesaver.

Here’s a great place to get started!

Authors

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How to Lose Weight, Not Muscle

 

If you’re ready to join the 14 day FREE clean eating group, click here!

If you’re ready to jump in with a Challenge Pack…go HERE!

 

Losing weight and gaining muscle can often seem at odds. You’ve heard the classic advice: If you want to shed pounds, you have to eat fewer calories while burning more of them. If you want to gain muscle, you have to do just the opposite, increasing your caloric intake while working your muscles hard. So is it possible to attack the two most popular fitness goals at the same time? The answer is an unequivocal yes. Just follow these three simple rules.

 

Skip the Long Runs
If you want to lose fat, don’t go the aerobic route, say researchers at Pennington Biomedical Research Center, in Louisiana. Their study comparing the weight-loss results of people who did aerobic workouts while dieting with those who only dieted found that steady state cardio (think: jogging, stationary cycling, rowing) added almost nothing to the weight loss equation. When it comes to shedding pounds, you want to be the hare, not the tortoise: A 2011 Australian study found that shorter, tougher workouts (e.g., sprints, intervals, high-intensity strength circuits) consistently resulted in significant fat loss. Added bonus: Working out at a high intensity specifically targets abdominal fat—the most insidious kind that wraps around your internal organs, increasing the size of your belly and your risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and even cancer.

 

Don’t Starve Yourself
If you want to lose fat, you have to cut your caloric intake. But if you also want to also maintain (or even build) muscle, cutting a little works better than cutting a lot, according to Norwegian scientists. Their study found that strength-training athletes who cut calories by 30 percent saw no change in muscle mass, but those who cut calories by just 19 percent were able to increase their muscle mass while also leaning out. Shoot for losing no more than 1 percent of your bodyweight—or roughly 1 to 2 pounds—per week, suggest the researchers.

 

Prioritize Protein
You need protein to build muscle. If you want to lose fat at the same time, you may need even more: A 2016 study found that overweight men on an intense fitness routine and a calorie-restricted diet were able to gain muscle over a 4-week period—but only if their protein intake was high. Protein should make up slightly more than one-third of your total caloric intake. Don’t want to do the nutritional math? Eyeball it: Meat, fish, poultry, and other protein should take up about a third of your plate at each meal.

If you’re ready to join the 14 day FREE clean eating group, click here!

If you’re ready to jump in with a Challenge Pack…go HERE!

Authors

Andrew Heffernan CSCS, GCFP

Nine foods that aren’t as healthy as you think!

 

Beachbody-Blog-9-Healthy-Foods-Dont-Eat

Are you ready to get your veggies and fruits in one healthy, whole-food shake? Get your servings HERE!

If you have a cheat meal or eat unhealthily every so often, that isn’t so bad (we try and follow the rule of eating an 80% clean diet). But, what if you’re eating badly and don’t know it? Sure, you stay away from deep-fried Oreos, but is your favorite “health food” snack keeping you from reaching your goals?

Here are nine foods that have successfully disguised themselves as “diet-friendly” foods. Don’t let them fool you.

Granola
Shocked? Granola is often touted as an outdoorsy health snack. Yet, it’s super high in calories and many variations are loaded with sugar and saturated fat.
Solution: Go raw. Muesli is basically just raw granola and it tends to have less sugars and oils—but just in case, always read the label. If you are trying to lose weight, make sure to measure to keep your portion size reasonable.

Frozen Diet Meals
Frozen dinners are not as healthy as they advertise. Though many are low in calories (most range from around 240–400 calories), they are highly processed, lacking in nutrients, and brimming with sodium. Although they may seem convenient, you give up a lot in exchange for the convenience of a three-minute microwaved meal.
Solution: Prepare healthy meals in bulk at the beginning of the week to deter you from having to choose these unhealthy convenient options. Or, if you absolutely must, read the labels. Some brands are better than others. Amy’s Kitchen, for example, does a better job than most.

Sports Drinks
Note the word “sports” in the title. These drinks are specifically designed to replenish carbs, electrolytes and other nutrients during long, hard efforts. In any other situation, they’re just sugar water. You might as well drink soda.
Solution: Generally, sports drinks are only useful for hard exercise going longer than an hour. Otherwise, you’re probably better off with water. However, if you’re eating at a calorie deficit and you’re having a hard time making it through your 30–60 minute workout, a little extra blood sugar might help, so experiment with a diluted sports drink. And again, read labels. High fructose corn syrup or artificial dyes won’t give you the fitness boost you’re looking for.

“Fat Free” Products
“Fat Free” might look good on paper, but your body actually needs fat! Plus, as Nutrition Expert Denis Faye explains, in most of these products “they just replace the fat with carbs and salt, so you’ve basically gone from pouring a little unsaturated fat on your salad to dumping on a pile of sugar.”
Solution: Stick with simple homemade dressings, like balsamic vinaigrette, and, if you’re out, ask for them on the side to control how much you’re using.

Muffins
American-style muffins first came into popularity at the end of the 18th century…and never went out of fashion again. But, this sweet quickbread is hardly healthy. Take those tempting blueberry muffins you see at some classic coffee chains. They’ll pack on about 460 calories and 15 grams of fat. Not to mention they’re usually made with refined flour, tons of sugar, and goodness knows what preservatives.
Solution: Almost all store-bought muffins should really just be avoided. If you’re really craving a muffin, try this flourless chocolate muffin that’s lower in calories and higher in fiber and other good-for-you components. Or, this plum bran muffin if you’re looking for a real fruit and fiber boost.

Sushi
As far as proteins go, fish deserves a high place in your diet and sushi can be a great way to enjoy it. However, most sushi is more rice than fish, and sometimes, it’s been deep fried (we’re looking at you, spider roll) or coated with mayonnaise (cue the dynamite roll and almost any sushi that has “spicy” in the name). While it’s never a complete junk food, like many items here, you can’t chow down without restraint and expect to see nothing but benefits.
Solution: If you do rolls, try to choose rolls made with brown rice or those that are low-carb (in other words, rice free). Or, stick with sashimi.

Pretzels
Don’t confuse these travel-friendly little bites that are low in fat, for a “healthy” snack. This carb-heavy, calorie-laden treat is almost completely devoid of nutrients and is often high in sodium. For instance, you’ll get an entire day’s worth of sodium in one cup of Rold Gold pretzels.
Solution: Stick to nutrient-dense snacks like almonds, walnuts, pumpkin seeds, or sunflower seeds. Just keep an eye on the serving size if you’re watching your weight.

Veggie Chips
Just because something contains the word “veggie” in the name doesn’t mean it’s healthy. High in fat and sodium, Veggie Chips are often extraordinarily high in fat and sodium and, honestly, not much better for you than potato chips.
Solution: When snacking, eat your veggies raw—and dip them in hummus if you want to add flavor.

Tea
What’s the problem with tea today? It’s mainly not tea! Most mass-produced teas come bottled with preservatives and designer drinks like chai lattes pump the sugar and additive content through the roof.
Solution: Try Tejava (which is all-natural and just contains brewed tea), stick to unsweetened teas from your local coffee shop, or brew your own. It’s easy!

Authors

 

Are you ready to get your veggies and fruits in one healthy, whole-food shake? Get your servings HERE!

What’s with Soy?

 

Our 14 Day Clean Eating Challenge is a great way to start (or continue) on your path to health.  Read more here!

 

I recently watched a video by Dr. Mercola…he taught me quite a bit about why soy is in everything (in America) and why we are so sick.

First of all, I learned that the reason soy is in everything in the U.S. is because it’s grown here.  A while back, everything that needed an oil was made with Palm or Coconut oil.  Problem with that? Except for Hawaii, neither are grown in the U.S.  So…the government decided to make those oils “bad” for us and make corn and soy oils “good” for us.  It’s cheap, easy to make, and helps out the American farmers…so that’s that.

soy protein, whey, sources of protein, is soy bad, soy protein options, soy powder,

I have read many, many reports and opinions on soy.  Some claim that soy is terrible and the root of all evil – causing a variety of diseases and disorders. Some claim that soy is great and can reduce prostate and breast cancer in men (funny how the soy-is-bad people say that it CAUSES prostate and breast cancer in men). However, the few reports that I came across saying that soy is fine and shouldn’t be avoided or limited were U.S. Department of Agriculture meta-analysis of “up-to-date available epidemiologic studies”… surprising to me? Not really. I have a hard time believing reports that benefit the source so blatantly.  But, this is just to make people aware.  There are other options of protein: whey, eggs, meat, peas, quinoa, nuts and nut butter, beans, chickpeas, tempeh and other FERMENTED soy products (miso, natto, tamari), hemp, leafy greens, chia seeds, sunflower/sesame/poppy seeds, seitan, unsweetened cocoa powder…  With all of these options, you can come up with some great alternatives without the question of health and safety. 

Why do vegetarians and vegans use soy?

The thing is…vegans and vegetarians use soy as a protein.  They use it often as a main source of protein.  I know many vegetarians, and it seems that they all take a protein powder (soy fortified) or eat tofu.  One thing about the vegetarians…some of them aren’t any healthier for not eating meat.  If it’s a personal choice to not murder animals for their nutritional offerings…I understand.  I also understand that for many, processing meat proteins are difficult.  Others just don’t like meat.  Another reason to not eat meat is because it is often full of unhealthy stuff – GMO feed, antibiotics, etc.  So, I’m not knocking vegans or vegetarians.  I totally understand. BUT, what worries me is that they supplement with a soy protein. I’m going to talk about GOOD soy proteins later…just let’s get through the bad stuff first.

Why is Soy Protein Bad for You?

Why should we avoid soy proteins and soy in general?

90 – 95% of soy is GMO…that means it’s genetically modified.  What does THAT mean? It means that a soy gene is modified to provide resistance to Round-Up.  Yes…the weed killer.  That way, farmers can spray their soy crops with Round-Up and not kill the soy plant or damage it in any way.  It DOES make for a more effective harvest.

Second and third generation (in mice) shows harm. GMO foods cause sterility / infertility in mice by the 3rd generation.

It was first modified to confer herbicide resistance in 1996.

BUT…of the 5% that isn’t GMO, it still has some pretty bad statistics.

Soy as a Goitrogen

There is a lot of information on this…but basically some claim that soy inhibits thyroid function.  Others say it doesn’t. Some say that in order to negate this, one would just need to steam or cook the soy…but others say that’s the case with some veggies like kale and cauliflower, but cooking soy doesn’t help.  The point is, there is enough information and research on this to say it’s possible that soy might contribute to a poorly functioning thyroid.  Whether it causes it or contributes to it…I can’t decipher.

But here is something that claims that soy, GMO or not, is bad for those with thyroid problems…and can actually cause thyroid problems to occur.

http://blog.paleohacks.com/top-11-goitrogenic-foods-thyroid-health/

Top 11 Goitrogenic Foods:

Bok Choy

Broccoli

Brussels sprouts

Cabbage

Cauliflower

Kale

Kohlrabi

Mustard and Mustard greens

Radishes

Rutabagas

Soy (anything)

Turnips 

Here is an article that states a different opinion…which I’m open to as well. 

And more…

Soy and Estrogen

Again, this is very complex and debated.  Some believe that soy mimics estrogen and can cause hormonal trouble.  Others disagree.  I’m not a doctor or a scientist,  so I don’t know.  But it’s always good to read up.  It’s something about the isoflavones and the endocrine system…and cancer. Better safe than sorry.

http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/eating-soy-increase-estrogen-production-2870.html

Soy and Phytic Acid

Again…there are those that say yes, and those that say no. But in the case of soy and phytic acid, there is more of a consensus that the relationship is negative.  Soy is high in phytic acid, as are other foods. With those foods, soaking will reduce the phytic acid…but not with soy. Only with fermentation does the phytic acid lessen.  (more on that later.)   Here’s more research on phytic acid and what it does, but basically it prohibits mineral absorption. This is not always a bad thing, but we do need some minerals, many actually.  So, yet another reason to avoid soy…especially if you have mineral deficiencies.

Here’s some information on MSG…

And more ways that MSG is hidden in our foods, labeled under tricky names.  Soy is one of the top foods with MSG.

Soy Infant Formula and Infant Formula Fortification Protocol

With all of the above possible negative theories (I say theories, because again, there are two sides to every coin)…why would we want to feed soy to our babies? If a child has a milk / lactose issues, and breastfeeding isn’t an option, soy is the next go-to formula.

Here’s an interesting article about soy infant formula...

According to the Weston A. Price Foundation:

Toxicologists estimate that an infant exclusively fed soy formula receives the estrogenic equivalent of at least five birth control pills per day. By contrast, almost no phytoestrogens have been detected in dairy-based infant formula or in human milk, even when the mother consumes soy products. A recent study found that babies fed soy-based formula had 13,000 to 22,0000 times more isoflavones in their blood than babies fed milk-based formula.

The article has been written dozens of times, and there is a way to take milk and make it baby friendly…and healthy.

http://www.gabriellebrick.com/blog/2011/09/infant-formula-fortification-protocol-102200

Here’s the original information: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2000/10/22/infant-formula-part-one.aspx

A summary:

  • Kiddie Krill - one per day
  • Organic egg yolk - 1 yolk daily added at four months of age
  • Organic cream ideally non-pasteurized and non-homogenized — If you are unable to find a local dairy farmer who will cooperate with you please try this link: http://www.realmilk.com/where.html.
  • Omega Nutrition pure sesame, walnut, safflower, sunflower, oils (rotate with above) - 1 teaspoon daily
  • One teaspoon high quality coconut oil. This oil needs to be heated to 76 degrees to become a liquid.

Base oils as safflower, sunflower and sesame can be blended into the formula.

Omega 6 in Soy

I hate to keep sending you to other places…but it’s just too much science for me to post here.  However, Omega 3s are the good ones. Omega 6s are bad when consumed at too high of a ratio.  We should be consuming Omega 6 and Omega 3 at a 1:1 ratio.  Most Americans are at a 16:1 ratio.

I can’t paraphrase all of the science behind this, so if you want more information – Google it, or start here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omega-6_fatty_acid

Good Types of Soy

 

Again, I know I keep saying this: I’m not a scientist or a doctor.  I know some of these websites seem a bit “conspiracy theory” like.  I understand that there are two sides to every coin.  But, I also know that people are trying to eat well and they keep getting sicker.  I also know that the food industry has sneaky ways of labeling things.

So, I take this all with a grain of salt…but, it’s something to think about.  Trying to eat healthy? Take a look at all the processed foods you eat with soy of some sort.  Try taking those foods out of your diet for a week…probably two to get a good idea of soy’s effect on your health.  Then, let me know! I’d love to hear more.

If you’d like to join in on our 14 day clean eating challenge, CLICK HERE! It’s free!

 

Leptin, Hormones, Hypothalamus, and Resetting Your System

 

What is Leptin?

So…this might be a lot for you all to take in: Leptin, hormones, hypothalamus, immune system, thyroid, weight loss / gain, energy levels, nutrition, health, fitness. Yes, it’s all intertwined.  I believe that most people know this to be true, yet few are willing to do much about it.

I’m taking part in a 6 Day Reset – where I am addressing my health at a hormonal level.  It’s more than just being healthy on the outside (weight, muscles, endurance and such). It’s also about being healthy on the inside (energy, mental state, and brain function).

Click HERE to get more information on the 6 day reset.

leptin, hormones, energy, hypothalamus, brain function, weight loss, hormones, thyroid

What is Leptin?

The short answer is: it’s a hormone that comes from your hypothalamus.  If you remember, the hypothalamus is something that I’ve been researching and teaching about for over two years now.  It’s what regulates your hunger, thirst, mood, relationships, and sleep.  That’s sums up who we are, doesn’t it? The hypothalamus is regulated by glucose and sends out hormones to the rest of our system.  Leptin is created there…in the hypothalamus.  Read more about my findings and beliefs concerning the hypothalamus here.

Read more about Leptin herehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leptin I’ve spent most of my day researching this for you. Basically – it’s the hunger hormone. It tells us when we are full.  It regulates appetite to achieve energy homeostasis. In obesity, a decreased sensitivity to leptin occurs, resulting in an inability to detect satiety despite high energy stores.

The purpose of Day 2 of the 6 Day Reset is to fix this imbalance or decreased sensitivity.  We need to reset our brain…don’t think “I have no will-power” or “I just can’t seem to put the fork down,” think “what’s going on in my brain that is making me keep eating?”  The thing is, it’s an addiction.  It has to do with dopemine and our nutrition.

What peripheral systems (non-Hypothalamus) does Leptin effect?

Circulatory, reproduction, bone, brain (hippocampus), and the immune systems are affected by Leptin in a variety of ways. Wikipedia says, “…, chronically elevated leptin levels are associated with obesity, overeating, and inflammation-related diseases, including hypertensionmetabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease.”  

Thyroid, gut, heart, brain…what else is there? This stuff is for real, and it’s important to not develop a decreased sensitivity to Leptin…and if you already have, there’s a chance to reset!

You need to RESET your relationship with FOOD

How? If you specifically fight belly fat, it very well could be something as simple as too much fructose in your diet.  Fructose? That’s the stuff in FRUIT.  That’s what makes fruit sweet.  Can you get too much? Yes and no. The interesting thing I just discovered is that about 60% of adults have difficulty processing sugar from fruits: FRUCTOSE.  And the thing is, it’s added to a lot of processed food.  First: HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP. Yes, that’s right. That’s why people were taught to believe that HFCS was “good” for you – the sugar comes from fruit, so it can’t be all that bad, right?  Well, if you’re not burning off that extra fructose, or if you have trouble processing it on your own, it WILL turn to fat.

Here’s how to reset your sensitivity to Leptin:

  1. Stop eating fruit for three days.  No sugar, no fruits, no added fructose, no sweets.  Try to keep your fructose levels to less than 20 grams per day.  Some veggies (true veggies, not tomatoes) will still have some fructose.  That’s okay.  But stick to true veggies.  True veggies are foods without seeds (this is debatable, but just for now, humor me).
  2. Eat protein with your first meal.  Eggs, meat, tofu, etc.  Give it a go.  If you need ideas of high-protein foods, just Google it!
  3. Eat at least one pound of vegetables eat day…for three days. Again, real vegetables are key here.
  4. Increase the good fats: coconut oil, fish, avocados, olives.
  5. Eliminate alcohol for three days.

You can always look into Leptin food lists, hormones in the body, and fructose intolerance.  The findings are interesting.  You can get lost in the research, but if you believe that you have these issues…it’s worth the look.

It is important to know that everyone is different. While some will respond very well to this reset, some will need an extra boost.  Ask me for more information on Leptin, the hypothalamus, and how nutrition can reset your entire system.

Here are some new ways to get rid of toxins in your body and environment: CLICK HERE!

Check out our free program to help you reach your goals:

GOAL TRACKER

 

Self-Sabotage

 

Want to check out our Clean-Eating Challenge? Click Here!

Self-sabotage.

What is it? Seriously, what does that even mean? Does it really mean that people would actually stop themselves from being the best they can be?  How does something like that even get a name?

If we were created to be amazing, awesome, and fabulous…why would WE be the ones to stop ourselves from reaching that potential? Why do we self-destruct? How are we so good at procrastination when it comes to our hopes and dreams? Our goals?

I would think (hope) that no one would intentionally self-sabotage, that no one would consciously make that choice. But, what IS it? What causes those habits and inner voices to take over our will-power and natural instincts to be great?

self-sabotage, self-destruct, procrastination

How is self-sabotage creeping in?

Mostly, self-sabotage comes in the form of procrastination and talking yourself out of reaching goals. It undermines our potential. We believe these acts to be helpful – to be saving us from some disaster, but in the long-run, these acts lead to us wanting more, being discouraged, and losing ourselves.

Here’s what I’m talking about:

You imagine yourself being healthier. Not even losing weight or body-building…but just being healthier because it’s good for you. It’s the right thing to do. Perhaps you would like to stop eating sugars, or maybe it’s processed food that you want to cut out. Dairy? Alcohol? Something as simple as chips?

Of course there is always one more event, one more birthday party, one more holiday that’s just around the corner.  For me, every Wednesday at work is treat day. Every. Single. Wednesday.   There are doughnuts, cupcakes, cookies, Chex Mix, bagels and cream cheese, more cookies, pita chips, hummus, dips, crackers, banana bread…oh – and the occasional fruit and veggie tray (and those all come with dips and sauces).  But seriously, it’s every Wednesday. Then, there are the staff birthdays.  It seems like we might go a month or two with no birthdays, but then (like April) there are five in a row…almost every other day we are having special treats.

And, it’s not just healthy habits that I’m talking about.  I am talking about finding the perfect relationships (just when you find a good one, you do something stupid that causes it to end before it ever really starts). Or maybe it’s your job…you know, staying where you are even when a GREAT offer comes along; it must be too good to be true, you’re comfortable where you are, you’ve made such good friends, it’s close to your favorite bar…

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Here’s what I’ve learned about Self-Sabotage and Self-Destructing behaviors:

1. The first step is to recognize it. Spot it.  Call it out: why am I thinking this way? Is there really a lot of risk involved, or am I just being a chicken? Why am I procrastinating? What are the effects of procrastination?

2. Try to understand the message. What is your conscience trying to tell you? Is it throwing up a red flag of “OMG, you better stop right now!!!”  or is it just a yellow “hey, use a little caution here, friend” type of flag?

3. Perhaps you are experiencing the “upper limit problem.”  Are you getting comfortable with your current level of success? Are you afraid of failing? Are the risks not worth the possible outcome?

Once you figure out the why of that negative self-talk…it’s easier to start on the why not?!

I encourage you to Google images for self-sabotage.  I keep trying to think of words to describe all of the Google images that come up – but that’s just it…a picture is worth a thousand words. Just go Google it.

This website is an amazing source of information. Check it out!

Here is another great article about self-sabotage and how it can ruin a perfectly good plan.  Click here.

If you are looking to better yourself, reach your goals, be the amazing person you were meant to be…follow this blog, friend me on Facebook, comment below. I’m here to be your encourager!

Low Fat Diet

 

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I’ve written about Low Fat Diet trends before, but I think this topic warrants a second visit.

When did the low fat diet become trendy?

For many decades now, the health authorities have told everyone to eat a low-fat diet. Doctors, nutritionists, dietitians…they claim that a diet low in fat will keep people from getting fat.

At the time the low-fat dietary guidelines were conceived (1977), people thought that saturated fat was a significant cause of heart disease. Saturated fats are the fats that are solid at room temperature (yes, like coconut…THE health trend of this decade). Here is some great information about saturated (and other) fats…that may or may not be interesting to you. I guess it depends on your family history and current health / medical recommendations.

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/NutritionCenter/HealthyEating/Saturated-Fats_UCM_301110_Article.jsp

Basically, low fat has been the cornerstone of healthy eating for several years.

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Why are we getting fat while eating low fat?

With the recommendation of staying away from fats, many people and organizations have also moved away from meat, eggs, and full-fat dairy products (high fat) and moved towards grains, legumes, fruits (low fat, high carb)…and vegetables (always a good choice).

These low-fat  guidelines were based on weak evidence, and many respected scientists objected. They believed that moving to a low-fat diet could have unforeseen consequences.

Recently, the “science” behind these ideas have been disproven.  Many high quality research studies show that there is, in fact, no association between saturated fat and cardiovascular disease. If you REALLY want to see the science behind these studies, this is a good place to start:

http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/early/2010/01/13/ajcn.2009.27725.abstract

Here’s another study summary:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9635993

Chances are, you won’t read (or even click) those links, but yes, they are official studies that say…there isn’t much correlation between fats and heart disease.

AND…of course, there are still studies and such that claim that saturated fats ARE harmful.  Here’s one that leans toward limiting fats: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/NutritionCenter/HealthyEating/Saturated-Fats_UCM_301110_Article.jsp 

 

So…what does that mean for you?

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Low fat or high fat diet?

I’ve seen pictures of my family in 1977: there were some heavy people.  There were some “big” people. However, it was nowhere near what we see today.  When did the obesity epidemic start? Around 1977.

Here’s the bottom line:

When you stop eating “fats”, you often stop eating proteins. Proteins are important. More on that next time.

When you eat low-fat foods, they are made to taste better with sugars and artificial flavors.

If you stop eating animal fats, you often replace that with vegetable oils…these are thought to be much worse for your overall health. Processed seed- and vegetable oils ar unhealthy, loaded with Omega-6 fatty acids and trans fats that can contribute to disease. And, they are often GMO…also not good.

Moderation is key!

I know that you know that already.  Eating pounds of butter is terrible. Eating pounds of grapes is also terrible. Eating a diet that you can’t maintain is terrible.  Eating Fettuccine Alfredo (2 cups) and a slice of garlic bread at 54 grams of fat isn’t going to kill you.  Eating that every day is terrible.   Taco Bell’s Supreme Chicken Fajita and Bell Grande Nachos: 64 grams of fat.  That might be too much even on a good day. Terrible. But, we still do it.

Eat vegetables, eat some fruit, eat some whole grains…everything in moderation!

Side note: Trans fats resemble saturated fat in consistency and shelf life, but the chemical composition is still very different. While saturated fats are possibly harmless, trans fats are highly toxic and should be avoided.

Here is some more information (mostly the same, but a little different…)

 

Do I Need to Avoid the Sugar in Fruit?

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Is Fruit Sugar Bad?

The Short Answer:

No, you don’t need to avoid sugar in fruit , even if you are going for a sugar-free diet.  Fresh fruits that come from the produce section opposed to the bagged or canned section should be a major part of most healthy diets. Fruits will generally provide more calories than vegetables, but there are essential vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients found primarily in fruits that mean those calories are going to good use. Yes, fruits contain a lot of sugar – but they are also high in fiber content. Fiber helps slow the absorption of the sugars so there isn’t as much of a spike in blood glucose. So, no, you don’t need to worry about fruit sugar.

That being said…if you are a binge eater, it won’t matter what you eat, too much is too much.

The American Diabetes Association recommends, “Having a piece of fresh fruit or fruit salad for dessert is a great way to satisfy your sweet tooth and get the extra nutrition you’re looking for.” If you are looking for ways to avoid sugar – fruit is not a good place to start.

 

The Long Answer: Is Fruit Sugar Bad?

Some say that when first starting a healthy diet – you will need to stop eating all sugars. This will boost your fat-burning process (using stored energy / fat since there is no new input of fast energy / sugar).  Also, some believe that in order to cut out bad sugars (processed and added sugar) that cutting out all sugars and sweet tastes will curb your appetite for more.  There is a lot of merit to these beliefs.  And, I have to say that I agree – for some, cutting out all sweets, including fruits, might be a good boost to your new, healthy eating plan.  But, you need the nutrition found in fruits and shouldn’t go without for long periods of time. Vitamin C, electrolytes, anti-oxidants, fiber, Vitamin A, iron, folate,  potassium…fruits are important to our overall wellness.  Even fruit sugar is needed to operate our body – so to cut it out completely for long periods of time wouldn’t promote a healthy lifestyle.

 

And, don’t forget about phytonutrients.  Nutritional science discovers something amazing about phytonutrients every day. One thing we know, though, is that they tend to be more effective when they are allowed to function synergistically with the other compounds in fruits and veggies. As Cornell University Professor of Food Science Rui Hai Lui points out in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, “Food provides not only essential nutrients needed for life but also other bioactive compounds for health promotion and disease prevention… Consumption of fruit and vegetables, as well as grains, has been strongly associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, cataracts, and age-related functional decline”

 

But, if you’re looking for ways to avoid sugar…

Currently, nutrition and fitness experts are touting the evils of sugar. Since fruit has sugar – people are assuming that fruit also needs to be avoided.  All sugar isn’t terrible for you.  This brings us back to binge eating and our sweet tooth.  When you are wanting a sweet – go for an apple…not a candy bar.  You don’t need to avoid fruit sugar, you need to avoid added sugar.

If the ingredient lists sugar, raw sugar, honey, molasses, agave, maple syrup, corn syrup, dextrose, malt, lactose…there are at least 57 other names for added sugar – that is what you need to avoid.

How Your Body Processes Carbs and Fruit Sugar

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Our body really likes carbohydrates as a fuel source. When we consume carbs, enzymes in our digestive system break them down into their simplest possible form: sugar.  Starches, or complex carbs, take some time to break down. Sugars, or simple carbs, are easy to break down, if they need breaking down at all. Either way, the carbs you eat all become sugars called glucose and fructose.  At this point, your pancreas releases the hormone insulin, which does a few things with this blood sugar. If you’ve eaten fruit or complex carbs, insulin delivers sugar to the liver and muscles for use as fuel. If you’ve eaten simple carbs…or straight sugar, insulin converts the sugar to adipose tissue (body fat) to be broken down for energy at a future time.

If you continue to abuse this system – and consistently consume more sugar than your body can handle, insulin will not be able to do its job properly.  Insulin resistance might occur – your body could start creating more insulin – but, eventually, your system will begin to fail.  This leads to Type 2 Diabetes.  Cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, liver disease, and obesity can develop.

Fats and proteins will help avoid blood sugar spikes, but the most effective way to temper your carb intake is with fiber.  Fiber is extremely complicated and can’t be digested – so carb digestion is also slowed.

Fruits are generally rich in fiber – which makes the sugar content irrelevant.  An apple has 25 grams of carbs – 19 of those are sugar.  But – it also has 4.4 grams of fiber, which will drastically slow the sugar absorption down to a trickle.

Something else to consider – this works both ways.  Even something with low sugar content – like a slice of bread that also has low fiber content – will result in a spike in blood sugar levels much higher than with an apple.

Fruit Sugar and Weight Loss

Obviously, you can overeat fruit.  Eating six bananas or an entire bunch of grapes isn’t a good idea.  But, you can overeat (or over drink) all kinds of healthy items: water, seeds, fish, watermelon.

Like most things in life, moderation is the key.  The only exception to that rule is veggies…real veggies. Leafy greens.  It would be extremely difficult to over-eat kale or spinach.  But, I guess anything is possible.  I believe that for the most part, we way under-estimate the serving size of veggies, much like we over-estimate the serving size of sugary / processed foods. For the average person, 2-3 servings of fruit per day is perfect. If you’re highly active, that number might double. Keep in mind, that variety is also key.  Eating a well-rounded offering of fruits will bring you the most benefits.

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Ways to Avoid Sugar

Basically – you  should stay away from anything with sugar listed as an ingredient.  Here is a link that lists all the different names that sugar is called…they are getting creative.

Click here for ways to avoid sugar hidden in your foods.

Click here to have access to our clean-eating menus and grocery lists. IT’S FREE!

So, the bottom line is: no, you don’t need to avoid sugar in fruit.